You Can Live Gluten Free


It took three decades to figure out what was making Donna Sawka  so sick. Her symptoms — bloating, chronic diarrhea  and weight loss — began early in childhood, and they only became worse as she aged.

2149658_orig-300x265

Nine years ago, after developing severe anemia, a specialist told Ms. Sawka that she had celiac disease.  The digestive disorder causes damage to the small intestine when gluten, a protein found in wheat, barley and rye, is ingested. People with the disease need to follow a strict gluten-free diet for the rest of their lives to avoid serious complications like osteoporosis and lymphoma, an immune system cancer.

Ms. Sawka, 48, of Fairless Hills, Pa., said she “was overwhelmed” upon learning she had the disease.

In 2006, the National Institutes of Health started a campaign to raise awareness of the disease among both the general public and physicians. A goal was to increase rates of diagnosis because, unlike many ailments, there is a definitive way to stop Celiac disease from progressing once it is recognized.

“The vast majority of cases experience a complete remission from symptoms once they are diagnosed and go on a gluten-free diet.  “So essentially, you have no disease. That is what makes it all the more important to be diagnosed.”

1b7345660488d95f9c263c1bb8318b4c

 

And there is no better time to be on a gluten-free diet. In 2008, 832 gluten-free products entered the market, nearly 6 times the number that debuted in 2003. Last year, gluten-free even emerged as a fad diet in the general population. Now we see the gluten-free products everywhere.

“The quantity and quality of these products is amazing,”

Dr. Fasano said gluten-free products used to taste like cardboard but had significantly improved in recent years. “The only problem,” he said, “is that they cost five or six times more than their normal counterparts.”

Researchers are also beginning to experiment with drugs that may be able to block the immune response  to gluten, much like a lactate pill. If the clinical trials are successful, individuals with Celiac disease may someday be  able to ingest small amounts of gluten.

Until then, the gluten-free diet is working for patients like Ms. Sawka. “I am perfect now,” she said after 35 years of feeling sick. “Every system in my body was in an uproar, and then everything just quieted down.”

By CAROLYN SAYRE

 

Do you know how many foods contain gluten.  You have to learn that to begin with.  And  you will need to become an expert in reading the ingredients on food labels and become a detective for gluten in the food that is not labeled.

Check out this Gluten Free Food List that should help.

Gluten-Free-Food-List

How To Best Use Food Allergy Dining Cards – including this Gluten Free Dining Card! Find this  on Living Without’s Gluten Free & More from My Life With Food Allergies via – Celiac and the Beast!  

f1aa36243745b7debc1ae338b8720c42

 

“The Food You Eat Can Be Either The Safest and Most Powerful Form Of Medicine Or The Slowest Form Of Poison.”

 

 

So What are the Causes and Risk Factors of Celiac Sprue?

It occurs mostly in whites of Northern European ancestry and is rare in Africans and Asians.

While the precise mechanism of intestinal damage is unknown, it is clear that removal of gluten from the diet results in resolution of symptoms and intestinal healing in most patients.

GettyImages-157740401-56965dfe5f9b58eba49db198

Gluten refers to the protein component of grains such as wheat, rye, barley, and oats (but not rice or corn).

The exact cause of  Celiac disease is unknown. The lining of the intestines contains areas called villi, which help absorb nutrients. When people with Celiac disease eat foods or use products that contain gluten, their immune system reacts by damaging these villi.

This damage affects the ability to absorb nutrients properly. A person becomes malnourished, no matter how much food he or she eats.

The disease can develop at any point in life, from infancy to late adulthood.

Symptoms of Celiac disease vary among sufferers and include:

 

celiac-disease-symptoms

Auto-immune” describes the way that the disease does damage; “auto” means “to oneself” so it is saying that the immune system of a Celiac mistakenly does damage to the Celiac rather than to the supposed invader.
What happens is that the immune system believes that a portion of the food eaten needs to be attacked, and as a side-effect of the attack, the lining of the small intestine gets damaged.
Celiacs who are not following a gluten-free diet will suffer from damage to the lining of their small intestines (specifically, to the “villi” the little hair-like growth that helps process food in the small intestine).
This damage slows and even prevents the digestion of food, which can lead to malnutrition (anemia, osteoporosis, vitamin deficiencies, and more)
An Open Letter Ms.Modify  wrote to Celiac Disease when she was sick in bed. People often don’t know the severity of this illness and tend to link it with food allergies (which it is not!!)
96a42284f170e81da51f669fe98b4ef5
 If you have been recently diagnosed and  struggling with transitioning to a gluten-free diet,  The Celiac Disease Foundation has a helpful 7 Day Gluten-Free Meal Plan. Full of ideas on how to get started! 
CDF_7MealPlan_JumpStart_c1
 

b0ceeb15f2baea1ef2b44c290cde7231

(The Gluten-Free Recipes for Kids cookbook offers more than 85 kid-friendly gluten-free recipes. The Gluten-Free Recipes for Kids cookbook does the planning for you. The spiral-bound cookbook includes an introductory section filled with helpful tips and educational information to help parents understand celiac disease, including a description of the dairy-free and gluten-free (GFCF) diet, and recipes to fit.)

Also, easily view gluten-free menus and allergen lists of chains and fast food restaurants. Find gluten-free pizza, bakeries, fast food, local businesses, and more!

Happy Gluten Free Eating! 🍴

 

Talk Soon,
EE597B21A4CECAB7BA426FE13063B9832

 

 

 

Hi there! Thanks for visiting. We’d LOVE for you to hang around! 
Like Us On Facebook,
and/or subscribe by email (which is on the Contact Page above)  to be sure you don’t miss an update!

 Disclosure of Material Connection: Some of the links in the post above may be “affiliate links.” This means if you click on the link and purchase the item, I will receive an affiliate commission.

Regardless, I only recommend products or services I use personally and believe will add value to my readers.

I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

 

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Website Pin Facebook Twitter Myspace Friendfeed Technorati del.icio.us Digg Google StumbleUpon Premium Responsive

Hello, We are very excited to be here. We hope you will like our website and come back often. We have 10 children between us and 25 grandchildren. We love anything family related. Dennis is a network dispatcher and Barbara works in the food industry and just finished a course in Medical Coding. Thank you for visiting.

You Might Also Like

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

CommentLuv badge